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Character Creation (Rules Cyclopedia)

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Character Sheet

(1)Roll for ability scores:

 

Roll 3d6 for each ability:

Strength

Intelligence

Wisdom

Dexterity

Constitution

Charisma

(2) Types of Character Classes:

 

Character Class          Prime Requisite(s)    Other Requirements

Cleric                              Wisdom                         None

Fighter                            Strength                         None

Magic-User                    Intelligence                    None

Thief                                Dexterity                        None

Dwarf                              Strength                         Constitution 9

Elf                                   Strength, Intelligence     Intelligence 9

Halfling                           Strength, Dexterity        Dexterity 9, Constitution 9

Druid                              Wisdom                          Neutral Alignment, 9th level cleric

Mystic                             Strength, Dexterity        Wisdom 13,Dexterity 13

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(3) Adjust Ability Scores:

 

You can trade two points from an ability score you don’t want to raise your prime requisite by one point. You can perform this trade as many times as you want, so long as you do not lower any ability below a score of 9. You cannot lower your Dexterity, Constitution or Charisma. You can only raise your character’s prime requisite score.

 

This is sort of like training hard to improve one skill while letting others be neglected. These are the rules for exchanging ability points:

1.        The prime requisite goes up 1 point for each 2 points that another ability score goes down. If a character has two prime requisites, both can be raised.

2.        Constitution and Charisma points cannot be exchanged with others.

3.        Dexterity cannot be lowered (but it may be raised for a thief or halfling character).

4.        No score can be lowered below 9. If it is already 10 or less, it cannot be lowered.

 

If you want to exchange any ability score points, you must do that now before continuing further in character creation. No such adjustments can be made later. Remember that you do not have to adjust any ability scores. This is an option, not a requirement.

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(4) Roll for Hit Points:

 

Find your character’s class on the Character Class and Hit Dice Table, and then roll the type of die indicated in order to find your starting hit points. Note that your character’s Constitution score can affect the number of hit points he will have. Look for the bonuses and penalties for ability scores table and apply the appropriate number to the number of hit points rolled for your character.

 

Character Class and Hit Dice Table

 

                                                    Dice for

Character Class                    Hit Points

Cleric                                            1d6

Fighter                                          1d8

Magic-User                                  1d4

Thief                                              1d4

Dwarf                                            1d8

Elf                                                  1d6

Halfling                                         1d6

Druid                                                *

Mystic                                           1d6

 

*Does not apply.

 

After a character reaches 9th level (or Name Level), the character no longer receives hit points by die roll. Instead, a given number of hit points will be gained. The number of hit points gained each level after 9th will be shown later, and it differs between classes.

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(5) Roll for Money:

 

Roll 3d6 and multiply by 10 to find your character’s starting gold pieces.

 

Money

Platinum pieces = pp           1 sp = 10 cp

Gold pieces = gp                  1 ep = 5sp = 50 cp

Electrum pieces = ep            1 gp = 2 ep = 10 sp = 100 cp

Silver pieces = sp                 1 pp = 5 gp = 10 ep = 50 sp = 500 cp

Copper pieces = cp             

 

Starting gold: Beginning characters receive a one-time sum of 3d6 x 10 gold pieces. This represents money saved up by the character before he embarked on his adventuring career, or money given him by family before he left home. It should be spent on weapons, armor, and equipment; the DM may have recommendations as to what the characters should buy. When first created, the character is assumed to own two or three sets of plain clothes, a pair of shoes, a belt and a belt pouch.

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(6) Buy Equipment:

Now that you have money, you can spend it on the equipment you need to go adventuring.

 

There are restrictions on what items your character is allowed to have, especially on armor and weapons. Be sure what your character’s class is allowed to use before you buy equipment.

Spells and Spellcasters

If your character is a spellcaster, he will also need to equip himself with the spells he knows. Magic Users know between one and four spells at first level, and clerics learn their first spell at second level.

 

Magic Users need to have spell books to record the spells they know. A magic user’s first spell book is free, a gift of the wizard who taught him. Clerics do not need spell books.

Weapons & Equipment

 

Item

Damage 

Range

S/M/L

Cost

(gp)

Encumbrance

(cn)

Notes

Ammunition: (See ammunition table)

Axes:

Axe, Battle

1d8

 

7

60

r,2H,M

Axe, Hand

1d6

10/20/30

4

30

t,S

Bows:

Bow, Short

1d6

50/100/150

25

20

a,m,2H,M

Bow, Long

1d6

70/140/210

40

30

a,m,2H,L

Crossbow, Lt.

1d6

60/120/180

30

50

a,m,s,2H,M

Crossbow, Hvy.

2d4

80/160/240

50

80

a,m,s,2H,L

Bludgeons:

Blackjack

1d2

 

5

5

c,r,s,S

Club       

1d4

 

3

50

c,r,M

Flail

1d6

 

5

40

c,M

Hammer, Throwing

1d4

10/20/30

4

25

c,t,M

Hammer, War

1d6

 

5

50

c,r,M

Mace     

1d6

 

5

30

c,r,M

Morning Star

1d6+1

 

5

40

c,M

Staff       

1d6

 

5

40

c,r,w,2H,M

Torch    

1d4

 

1/6

20

c,r,S

Daggers:

Normal  

1d4

10/20/30

3

10

t,w,S

Silver     

1d4

10/20/30

30

10

t,w,S

Pole Weapons:

Halberd 

1d10

 

7

150

s,2H,L

Javelin   

1d6

30/60/90

1

20

t,M

Lance    

1d10

 

10

180

s,v,L

Pike

1d10

 

3

80

s,v,2H,L

Polearm 

1d10

 

7

150

s,2H,L

Poleaxe  

1d10

 

5

120

s,2H,L

Spear     

1d6

20/40/60

3

30

t,v,L

Trident  

1d6

10/20/30

5

25

s,t,M

Shield Weapons:

Shield, Horned

1d2

 

15

20

s,S

Shield, Knife

1d4+1

 

65

70

s,S

Shield, Sword

1d4+2

 

200

185

s,v,M

Shield, Tusked

1d4+1

 

200

275

s,2H,L

Swords:

Short     

1d6

 

7

30

r,S

Normal  

1d8

 

10

60

r,M

Bastard 

One-Handed

1d6+1

 

15

80

r,HH,L

Two-Handed

1d8+1

 

15

80

r,2H,L

Two-Handed

1d10

 

15

100

2H,L

Other Weapons:

Blowgun, up to 2’

Nil

10/20/30

3

6

a,m,s,w,S

Blowgun, 2’+

Nil

20/25/30

6

15

a,m,s,w,2H,M

Bola       

1d2

20/40/60

5

5

s,t,M

Cestus   

1d3

 

5

10

s,S

Holy Water

1d8

10/30/50

25

1

c,s,t,w,S

Net         

Nil

10/20/30

n

n

s,t,w,M or L

Oil, Burning

1d8

10/30/50

2

10

c,s,t,w,S

Rock, Thrown

1d3

10/30/50

1/10

10

c,t,w,S

Sling      

1d4

40/80/160

2

20

c,m,w,S

Whip     

1d2

 

1/ft.

10/ft.

s,w,M

      

Weapon Special Effects Table

Failed Saving Throw Results*

Victim’s Level or Hit Dice

Bonus to Saving Throw

Bola, Blackjack

Net, or Whip

Blowgun

Up to 1

None

Knockout

Entangle

By poison

1 + 1 to 3

+ 1

Knockout

Entangle

By poison

3 + 1 to 6

+ 2

Stun

Slow

By poison

6 + 1 to 9

+ 3

Stun

Slow

By poison

9 + 1 to 12

+ 4

Delay

Delay

By poison

12 + or more

+ 5

Delay

Delay

By poison

* The effects of successful saving throws are explained in each weapon’s description

 

Ammunition Table

Weapon

Type of Ammunition

Standard Load (# of Shots)

Cost

(gp)

Enc. (# of shots per cn)

Blowgun

Dart

5

1

5

Bow

Arrow

20

5

2

 

Silver-tipped arrow

1

5

2

Crossbow

Quarrel

30

10

3

 

Silver-tipped quarrel

1

5

3

Sling

Stone or lead pellet

30

1

5

 

Silver pellet

1

5

5

                                                           

Armor Table

AC

Armor Type

Cost (gp)

Enc. (cn)

Magical

Enc. (cn)

Notes

(-1)*

Shield

10

100

50

D

8

Padded Leather

15

150

75

D, T

8

Cured Furs

& Skins

10

250

125

D, T

7

Leather Armor

20

200

100

D, T

6

Studded Leather

40

250

125

T

6

Scale Mail

30

300

150

 

5

Chain Mail

40

400

200

 

4

Banded Mail

50

450

225

 

3

Plate Mail

60

500

250

 

0

Suit Armor

250

750

375

S

* Subtract 1 from AC if a shield is used.

D             A Druid can use this type of armor if it contains no metal parts or other non-organic components (parts that have never been alive).

S              Suit armor has some very special characteristics; carefully read the description of this type of armor.

T             A thief can use this type of armor.

     

Adventuring Gear Table

 

Item

Description/Notes

Cost

Enc (cn)

Backpack

Capacity 400 cn

5 gp

20*

Belt                         

 

2 sp

5**

Boots, plain            

 

1 gp

10**

Boots, riding or swash-topped    

 

5 gp

15**

Cloak, short            

 

5 sp

10**

Cloak, long

 

1 gp

15**

Clothes, plain                                                          

Tunic and pants; blouse and skirt; Dress; robe; or equivalent

5 sp

20**

Clothes, middle-class

See above

5 gp

20**

Clothes, fine

See above

20 gp

20**

Clothes, extravagant

See above

50+ gp

30**

Garlic

 

5 gp

1

Grappling Hook

 

25 gp

80

Hammer, Small

 

2 gp

10

Hat or cap

 

2 sp

3

Holy symbol           

 

25 gp

1

Holy water

Breakable vial

25 gp

1

Iron spike               

One spike

1 sp

5

Iron Spikes              

Twelve spikes

1 gp

60

Lantern   

Burns oil

10 gp

30

Mirror                     

Hand-sized, steel

5 gp

5

Oil

One flask

2 gp

10

Pole                        

Wooden, 10’ long

1 gp

100

Pouch, belt              

Capacity 50 cn

5 sp

2*

Quiver     

For arrows or quarrels

1 gp

5***

Rations, iron

Preserved food for one person for

-one week

15 gp

70

Rations, standard

Unpreserved food for one person

-for one week

5 gp

200

Rope

50’ length

1 gp

50

Sack, small

Capacity 200 cn

1 gp

1*

Sack, large

Capacity 600 cn

2 gp

5*

Shoes

 

5 sp

8**

Spellbook

 

100 pages maximum

50 or 100 gp per page

200

Stakes (3) and mallet

 

3 gp

10

Thieves’ tools         

Lockpicks, wire, etc.

25 gp

10

Tinder box

Flint, steel, kindling

3 gp

5

Torch

One torch

2 sp

20

Torches

Six torches

1 gp

120

Waterskin/Wineskin

One-quart capacity; enc 30 when filled

1 gp

5

Wine

One quart, wineskin not included

1 gp

30

Wolfsbane

One bunch

10 gp

1

 

*

This is the item’s encumbrance when empty. When goods are placed within it, the encumbrance includes both the item’s encumbrance and the encumbrance of the goods within it. Thus a fully filled belt pouch has an encumbrance of 55 cn.

**

This is the encumbrance if packed. If the clothes are worn, disregard the encumbrance.

***

This is the quiver’s encumbrance when empty. Filled with arrows or quarrels, it is up to 10 cn for encumbrance. A 5 cn encumbrance quiver + 10 cn of missiles (20 arrows or 30 quarrels) still equals only a 10 cn encumbrance bundle to carry around.

  

Land Transportation Equipment

Riding Animal Costs Table                Land Transportation Gear Table                                                     

 Item                      Cost                           Item                                  Cost         Capacity (cn)        Notes    

Camel                     100 gp

Horse:                                                    Saddle & Tack                        25 gp        200 (enc 300)        (a)

-          Draft                 40 gp                      Saddle Bags                             5 gp        800 (enc 100)        (a)

-          Riding              75 gp                      Cart (2 wheels)                      100 gp       4,000/8,000           (b)

-          War                250 gp                      Wagon (4 wheels)                  200 gp      15,000/25,000         (b)

Mule                       30 gp                     

Pony                       35 gp                     

 

(a)                 The Encumbrance figure is the amount of weight the empty container adds to the load the horse carries.  A fully loaded saddlebag has an encumbrance of 900 cn.

(b)                 The cart’s or wagon’s capacity varies with the number of horses pulling it; one horse indicates the lesser capacity, two horses indicate the greater. These figures are based on using draft horses. Two

Mules can substitute for one horse.

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(7) Determine other numbers and rolls:

Armor Class, attack rolls and saving throws are numbers you’ll calculate from the character’s other attributes or find on tables according to level.

Armor Type and Armor Class Table

 

Armor Type                          Armor Class

No armor                                9

Leather armor                        7

Scale armor                           6

Chain mail                              5

Banded armor                       4             

Plate mail                               3

Suit armor                              0

Shield                                     subtract 1

 

Once you know your armor class as provided by your armor type, you can determine adjustments to your armor class from your Dexterity. Find your Dexterity score on the Bonuses and Penalties For Ability Scores table. For every +1 on the table, subtract 1 from your AC. For every –1, add 1 to your AC.

Attack Rolls for all 1st level characters.

 

AC:                  9      8       7      6      5       4      3      2        1        0             

Attack Roll:   10   11     12    13    14     15   16     17     18      19

 

AC:                -1     -2      -3     -4     -5     -6     -7     -8       -9    -10

Attack Roll:   20   20     20    20    20    21    22    23      24     25

Saving Throws

 

                                         Cleric      Fighter     Magic-User    Thief  

                                          1 – 4         1 – 3              1 – 5           1 – 4     

Death Ray/Poison            11              12                  13               13

Magic Wands                    12              13                  14               14

Paralysis/Turn to Stone    14              14                  13               13

Dragon Breath                  16              15                  16               16

Rod/Staff/Wand                15              16                  15               15

                                         Dwarf        Elf              Halfling        Mystic 

                                          1 – 3        1 – 3              1 – 3            1 – 3   

Death Ray/Poison              8             12                   8                12

Magic Wands                      9             13                   9                13 

Paralysis/Turn to Stone    10            13                  10               14           

Dragon Breath                  13             15                  13               15

Rod/Staff/Wand                12             15                  12               16 

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(8) Bonuses and Penalties for Ability Scores:

Ability Score         Adjustment

2 – 3                        -3 Penalty

4 – 5                        -2 Penalty

6 – 8                        -1 Penalty

9 – 12                      No adjustment

13 – 15                    +1 Bonus

16 – 17                    +2 Bonus

18                            +3 Bonus

Abilities and Adjustments Table

Ability                    Adjustments to:

Strength                 Attack Rolls (Melee Weapons and Unarmed Combat), Damage Rolls (Melee and Thrown Weapons), Opening Doors

Intelligence           Languages, General Skills

Wisdom                 Saving Throws vs. Spells

Dexterity                Attack Rolls (Thrown and Missile Weapons), Armor Class

Constitution          Hit Points per Experience Level

Charisma                Reactions from NPCs

Intelligence and Languages Table

Intelligence              Use of

Score                      Languages

3                                                              Has trouble speaking, cannot read or write

4 – 5                        Cannot read or write Common

6 – 8                        Can write simple Common words

9 – 12                      Reads and writes native languages (usually two)

13 – 15                    Reads and writes native languages, +1 additional language

16 – 17                    Reads and writes native languages, +2 additional languages

18                                                        Reads and writes native languages, +3 additional languages

Charisma Adjustment Table

 

Charisma                Reaction                  Max. No.                Retainer

Score                       Adjustment              Retainers               Morale  

3                                         -3                             1                             4

4 – 5                                  -2                             2                             5

6 – 8                                  -1                             3                             6

9 – 12                      No adjustment                 4                              7

13 – 15                             +1                            5                              8

16 – 17                             +2                            6                              9

18                                      +3                            7                             10

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(9) Character Alignment:

 

An Alignment is a code of behavior or way of life which guides the actions and thoughts of characters and monsters. There are three alignments in this game:

 

Good (Law)

Neutral (Neutral)

Evil (Chaos)

 

Certain characters are bound to their chosen alignment, mostly clerics, druids and mystics. Clerics must adhere to the tenants of their chosen alignment or lose the abilities to cast spells and turn undead. Clerics can choose any alignment at creation.

 

Druids must always remain neutral.

 

Mystics may be good, neutral or evil, but due to the strictness of their beliefs, they do not break oaths or ideals easily, and must always be of a lawful alignment.

 

Law

Law is the belief that everything should follow an order and that obeying rules is the natural way of life. Lawful creatures will try to tell the truth, obey laws that are fair, keep promises and care for all living things.

 

If a choice must be made between the benefit of a group or an individual, a Lawful character will usually choose the group. Sometimes individual freedoms must be given up for the good of the group. Lawful characters and monsters often act in predictable ways. Lawful behavior is usually the same as ‘good’ behavior.

 

Chaos

Chaos is the opposite of Law. It is the belief that life is random and that chance and luck rule the world. Laws are made to be broken, as long as a person can get away with it. It is not important to keep promises, and lying and telling the truth are both useful.

 

To a chaotic creature, the individual is the most important of all things. Selfishness is the normal way of life and the group is not important. Chaotics often act on sudden desires and whims. They have strong belief in the power of luck. They cannot always be trusted. Chaotic behavior is usually the same as behavior that could be called ‘evil’. Each individual player must decide if his chaotic character is closer to a mean, selfish ‘evil’ personality or merely a happy-go-lucky, unpredictable personality, or anywhere in between.

 

Neutral

Neutrality is the belief that the world is a balance between Law and Chaos. It is important that neither side get too much power and upset this balance. The individual is important, but so is the group; the two sides must work together.

A neutral character is most interested in personal survival. Such characters believe in their own wits and abilities rather than luck. They tend to return the treatment they receive from others. Neutral characters will join a party if they think it is in their own best interest, but will not be overly helpful unless there is some sort of profit in it. Neutral behavior may be considered ‘good’ or ‘evil’ or neither.

 

Alignment Behavior

Take this situation as an example: A group of characters is attacked by a large number of monsters. Escape is not possible unless the monsters are slowed down.

 

A Lawful character will fight to protect the group, regardless of the danger. The character will not run away unless the whole group does so or is otherwise safe.

 

A Neutral character will fight to protect the group as long as it is reasonably safe to do so. If the danger is too great, the character will try to save himself, even at the expense of the rest of the party.

 

A Chaotic character might fight the monsters or he might run away immediately – Chaotics are as always, unpredictable. The character may not even care what happened to the rest of the party.

 

Playing an alignment does not mean a character must do stupid things. A character should always act as intelligently as the Intelligence score indicates, unless there is a reason to act otherwise (such as a magical curse).

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(10) Select Name, Personality and Background:

 

Appropriate names please! This is a straightforward fantasy campaign. Elements can be drawn from a number of sources. Choose a name carefully. It should represent the character in some way, or at least be a name you like. You might find yourself playing this character for years, so if you give him a silly or inappropriate name, you might regret it later.

 

Volsted Gridban, Eando Binder, Bengo Mistral, Drax Amper, Cragg Beemish, Vektis Brack, & Astron Del Martia are good examples of fantasy sounding names, however, some of them may sound more sci-fi than fantasy.

 

Personality

 

There is more to a character’s personality than his alignment. You should think about your character’s mannerisms, the way he speaks, the way he dresses, how he spends his money, what sort of people he likes, how he spends his non-adventuring time, and so on. The more attention you invest in imagining your character, with all his traits, virtues and vices, the more interesting and ‘real’ you will make him. Sure it’s useful to have the mightiest warrior in the world, but none of the other players or characters will care whether he lives or dies unless he has a personality.

 

Background

 

At some point you’ll need to decide on your character’s background. Where and when he was born, how he was reared, who his family is, who his friends were, and what he did up until the time he enters play. This isn’t a solo effort – it’s a cooperative effort between you and the DM. He knows more about his campaign world than you do; you know more about your character than he does. The two of you have to work together to integrate your character into his world.

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(11) Character Height and Weight Tables:

 

Human characters                                                        Elf Characters

                     Male       Female                                                                   Male       Female

Height              Weight (cn)                                          Height                        Weight(cn)          

4’10”             1,100       1,050                                      4’8”                            900          750

5’0”               1,200       1,100                                      5’0”                         1,000          800

5’2”               1,300       1,200                                      5’2”                         1,100          900

5’4”               1,400       1,250                                      5’4”                         1,200       1,000

5’6”               1,500       1,300                                      5’6”                         1,300       1,100

5’8”               1,550       1,400                                      5’8”                         1,400       1,200

5’10”             1,650       1,500                                      5’10”                       1,500       1,300

6’0”               1,750       1,550                                      6’0”                         1,600       1,400

6’2”               1,850       1,650                                      6’2”                         1,800       1,500

6’4”               2,000       1,750                                      6’4”                         1,900       1,600

                                                                                               

Dwarf Characters                                                         Halfling Characters 

                      Male       Female                                                             (Both sexes)                  

Height             Weight (cn)                                          Height                  Weight(cn)  

3’8”               1,300       1,250                                     2'10"                           580

3’10”             1,400       1,350                                     3’0”                             600

4’0”               1,500       1,450                                     3’2”                             620             

4’2”               1,550       1,500

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(12) Earn Experience:

As characters go through a lot  of adventures, they gradually get better at what they do. Everyone learns to fight better (especially fighters), withstand damage (more hit points and better saving throws), and so forth. This is all accomplished through the use of experience points and experience levels. At the end of every game session or complete adventure story, the DM will award experience points (XP) to the characters. XP are awarded for accomplishing goals in the course of the adventure story.

 

Once a character has gained enough experience to go up a level, he gains more abilities. Under no circumstances can a character advance more than one level per adventure. All experience beyond one level of advancement can be retained up to one point short of a two level advance. Any additional experience is lost.

 

Prime requisites and Experience Points

If your character’s prime requisite is high enough, he will get extra experience points. The Experience Bonuses and Penalties Table will serve as your rule of thumb for calculating how much extra experience clerics, fighters, magic users and thieves get for high prime requisites.

 

Experience Bonuses and Penalties Table

 

Character Class    Prime Requisite and Experience Bonus/Penalty             

Cleric                      Wisdom 3 – 5: -20%

                                Wisdom 6 – 8: -10%

                                Wisdom 13 – 15: +5%

                                Wisdom 16 – 18: +10%

Fighter                    Strength 3 – 5: -20%

                                Strength 6 – 8: -10%

                                Strength 13 – 15: +5%

                                Strength 16 – 18: +10%

Magic User            Intelligence 3 – 5: -20%

                                Intelligence 6 – 8: -10%

                                Intelligence 13 – 15: +5%

                                Intelligence 16 – 18: +10%

Thief                        Dexterity 3 – 5: -20%

                                Dexterity 6 – 8: -10%

                                Dexterity 13 – 15: +5%

                                Dexterity 16 – 18: +10%

Dwarf                      Strength 3 – 5: -20%

                                Strength 6 – 8: -10%

                                Strength 13 – 15: +5%

                                Strength 16 – 18: +10%

Elf                           Strength 13 – 18 and Intelligence 13 – 15: +5%

                                Strength 13 – 18 and Intelligence 16 – 18: +10%

Halfling                   Strength 13 – 18 OR Dexterity 13 – 18: +5%

                                Strength 13 – 18 and Dexterity 13 – 18: +10%

Druid                      Wisdom 3 – 5: -20%

                                Wisdom 6 – 8: -10%

                                Wisdom 13 – 15: +5%

                                Wisdom 16 – 18: +10%

Mystic                     Strength 3 – 5: -20%

                                Strength 6 – 8: -10%

                                Strength 13 – 15: +5%

                                Strength 16 – 18: +10%

bar_flare_md_blk.gif

(13) Character Classes:

-The Dwarven Thief

-The Elven Thief

-The Halfling Thief

The Bard

The Neanderthal

15) Weapon Mastery

16. Time and Distance (Movement)

17) The Attack Roll

This work is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Any reproduction or unauthorized use of the material or artwork presented herein is prohibited without the express written consent of TSR, Inc. 1991 TSR, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Rules Compilation and Development: Aaron Allston

The D&D Cyclopedia is a derivative work based on the original Dungeons & Dragons game by E. Gary Gygax & Dave Arneson. The Cyclopedia has also been drawn from the works of and benefitted from the input of the following people: Jim Bambra, Brian Blume, Tim Brown, Jonatha Caspian, David Cook, Troy Denning, Anne C Gray, Ernie Gygax, Allen Hammack, Bruce Heard, Kevin Hendryx, John Eric Holmes, Harold Johnson, Tim kask, Jeff Key, Rob Kuntz, Alan Lucien, Steve Marsh, Frank Mentzer, Tom Moldvay, Mike Mornard, Steve Perrin, Jon Pickens, Brian Pitzer, Michael Price, Patrick L Price, Paul Reiche, Evan Robinson, Gordon Schick, Lawrence Schick, Don Snow, Edward G Sollers, Gary Speigle, Stephen D Sullivan, Ralph Wagner, Jim Ward, Jean Wells, and Bill Wilkerson. Additional thanks go to the Cyclopedia’s commentators and helpers: Mark Bennett, William W Conners, Alan Grimes, and the Role Players Guild of Kansas City, Bruce Heard, Rob King, Dirk Remmecke, and Luray Richmond.